Essay

Devolving the decision to reopen schools to local governments: is the central government relinquishing responsibility or making the right decision?

The decision to reopen schools to carry out in-person learning is left to local governments. Several regions have decided to reopen schools, while others put off the decision because of the surge of COVID-19 cases. Is devolving the authority to reopen schools to local governments the right decision?

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Four Decades of Teacher Professional Development in Indonesia: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

For more than four decades, Indonesia has carried out a variety of teacher professional development (TPD) programmes. Yet the outcomes have fallen short. Teachers continue to show limited subject knowledge and inadequate pedagogical skills. Indonesian students’ learning level remains low.

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How Computers Helped Indonesia Move From a Cheating Culture to a Learning Culture

In Indonesia, cheating on national exams was so widespread that a mother who exposed that her child's teacher promoted cheating was accused by other parents to be a ‘disgrace to the school’. When cheating is so common, it is likely that teachers and students collude to cheat. In that case, there is little chance that they will work to mitigate it, so it becomes hard to fight.

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Why Low-Performing and Poor Students in Yogyakarta Do Not Go to High-Quality Junior Secondary Schools, Even if They Could

In our previous blog, we discussed recent policy changes to shift junior secondary school admissions to those based on house-to-school proximity instead of the Grade 6 exam score. We showed that when Yogyakarta implemented this new admission policy, colloquially referred to as the ‘school zoning policy’, the student composition changed significantly. Many students with lower test scores and poor students who had not been previously admitted to public schools were now attending them, substantially improving equity in access to public schools.

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How Indonesia Attempts to Address Inequity in Access to Quality Education: The Case of Junior Secondary Schools in Yogyakarta

Basic education in Indonesia is compulsory and includes six years of primary school (Grade 1-6) and 3 years of junior secondary school (Grade 7-9). In the past decades, Indonesia has achieved huge progress in improving access to basic education. As of 2019, net enrolment rates were 98 percent at the primary level and 79 percent at the junior secondary level. This achievement can be largely attributed to government efforts to provide free education in public schools. Nevertheless, Indonesia still faces the challenge of improving equity in access to quality education, specifically at the junior secondary school level.

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